Clean Air News

Clean Air News

Get the latest information below about diesel retrofit grant programs, new clean diesel technology, national efforts to reduce diesel emissions, and much more.

Stay tuned for relevant updates and information, and fill out the information to the right to receive email newsletters regarding special funding and other important diesel emission news.

 

11/30/2011: Breathe Project & Heinz Endowments Announce Funding for Diesel Retrofits

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The Heinz Endowments is adding $920,000 to the Clean Diesel Construction Equipment Retrofit Fund. That matches the amount already in the fund that was started by the Allegheny County Health Department. The money will go to small businesses that have older diesel equipment that needs to be retrofitted, as per city ordinance.

New city regulations require contractors to use low-emissions construction equipment on projects that total $2.5 million or more. That had some fearing that small contractors would be pushed out of the process because of the cost associated with retrofits.

Read more: 11/30/2011: Breathe Project & Heinz Endowments Announce Funding for Diesel Retrofits

   

11/07/2011: EPA Announces Over $1.3 Million for Clean Diesel

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EPA Announces More than $1.3 Million for Clean Diesel Projects in New England States

Contact Information: Paula Ballentine, 617-918-1027

Boston, MASS — The U.S. EPA is awarding over $1.3 million in Clean Diesel funds for projects in all six New England states to reduce emissions and improve air quality. The EPA funds are part of a larger collaborative effort between EPA and New England states to leverage significant resources to reduce diesel emissions, improve public health, and promote clean diesel technology. This year they were able to leverage an additional $381,540 in state funding.

These grants bring a total of almost $6.2 million in federal funds and $2.3 million in state funds for State Clean Diesel funding to New England since the program’s inception four years ago. The funding is part of $12.6 million made available this year for State Clean Diesel programs nationwide, and is on top of prior Recovery Act funding of diesel projects.

Read more: 11/07/2011: EPA Announces Over $1.3 Million for Clean Diesel

   

10/20/2011: EPA Awards $50 Million for Clean Diesel Projects

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Reducing diesel emissions helps decrease asthma attacks and premature deaths.

Contact Information: Molly Hooven, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , 202-564-2313, 202-564-4355,

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded $50 million for clean diesel projects as part of its ongoing campaign to reduce harmful emissions in the air and better protect people's health. These efforts will replace, retrofit or repower more than 8,000 older school buses, trucks, locomotives, vessels, and other diesel powered machines. Reducing emissions from existing diesels provides cost-effective public health and environmental benefits while supporting green jobs at manufacturers, dealerships and businesses across the country.

Diesel engines emit 7.3 million tons of smog-forming nitrogen oxides (NOx) and 333,000 tons of soot annually. Diesel pollution is linked to thousands of premature deaths, hundreds of thousands of asthma attacks and millions of lost work days. While EPA's standards significantly reduce emissions from newly manufactured engines, clean diesel projects funded through these grants will work to address the more than 11 million older diesel engines that continue to emit higher levels of harmful pollution.

Read more: 10/20/2011: EPA Awards $50 Million for Clean Diesel Projects

   

9/8/2011: Diesel Emissions In Pittsburgh To Be Monitored

by CHAD HOUCK

Starting in January battery-operated monitors will be strapped to telephone and light poles in downtown Pittsburgh to measure diesel pollution. The Allegheny County Board of Health has approved spending $860,000 for the three year study to be conducted by the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. Jim Thompson, the county Health Department's Air Program Manager, said the goal is to determine when and where diesel emissions are the highest. "Our efforts have been somewhat scattered," said Thompson. "We've been focusing on various different sources such as school buses, tugboats and trains in various parts of the county. What we hope this study will do is focus our work so we can best deploy our assets."

Read more: 9/8/2011: Diesel Emissions In Pittsburgh To Be Monitored

   

8/31/2011: Cutting Soot Emissions: Fastest, most economical way to show global warming

DENVER -- A new study of dust-like particles of soot in the air -- now emerging as the second most important -- but previously overlooked -- factor in global warming provides fresh evidence that reducing soot emissions from diesel engines and other sources could slow melting of sea ice in the Arctic faster and more economically than any other quick fix, a scientist reported here today.

In a presentation at the 242nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Mark Z. Jacobson, Ph.D., cited concerns that continued melting of sea ice above the Arctic Circle will be a tipping point for the Earth's climate, a point of no return. That's because the ice, which reflects sunlight and heat back into space, would give way to darker water that absorbs heat and exacerbates warming. And there is no known way to make the sea refreeze in the short term.

Jacobson's calculations indicate that controlling soot could reduce warming above parts of the Arctic Circle by almost 3 degrees Fahrenheit within 15 years. That would virtually erase all of the warming that has occurred in the Arctic during the last 100 years.

Read more: 8/31/2011: Cutting Soot Emissions: Fastest, most economical way to show global warming

   

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